The Path of Hurricane Florence

Written by: Macie Movsesian

Hurricane Florence has been brought down to a Category 1 hurricane with extreme flooding that has taken over the East Coast. It had North and South Carolina in the bullseye of the storm so the most damage is there.

The death toll is at 37 people including 2 people from South Carolina who died from carbon monoxide poisoning due to a ruptured gas tank. A mother and her 1-year-old son were killed in their home by a falling tree in Wilmington, North Carolina. It has received over 30 inches of rain within the last week. The storm has also caused over 500,000 people to be without power.

It has moved on to the northern part of the U.S. near Pennsylvania and New York. It has had the most effect on the East Coast of the U.S. Some schools are remaining closed indefinitely because of how bad the damage was. In North Carolina, dozens of school districts are being closed with delays due to the hurricane. Also, 1.2 million out of 1.5 million students have missed school because of the storm that took over.

Simply put, a hurricane is a storm with a violent wind. The winds can be anywhere between 70 to 156 mph to become an actual hurricane. Hurricane Florence is known for being the wettest tropical cyclone on record. It is a very peculiar storm due to their being major flooding but the wind speed isn’t as high as it should be.

Here are some startling facts about the storm:

  • The rainfall in North Carolina could reach up to 40 inches.
  • In Wilmington, North Carolina, they have already had the rainiest year to date. They could be receiving up to 8 months’ of rain in just a few days.
  • The hurricane speed doubled in 2 days.
  • The storm covered up to 15,000 sq. miles in its prime.

 


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